when will you learn that there isn’t a word for everything?

December 7, 2018

Two of Brenda Dermody’s remixed Typographic Dante prints are on show in the Nunns Yard Gallery, Norwich, tonight, as part of the joint exhibition ‘When will you learn that there isn’t a word for everything?

The prints waiting to be parcelled up earlier this week.

The show is curated by Kristy Campbell and you’ll be able to see it take shape on Instagram.

For more of Brenda’s work, see the 100 Archive (http://www.100archive.com/people/brenda-dermody)

 

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to call no1.

November 22, 2018

Barrie was delighted to be asked to contribute to the very talented Petra Schulze-Wollgast’s new magazine ToCall.

Inspired by the last issue of Tlaloc, published in 1970 and edited by Cavan McCarthy, ToCall was mimeo printed in an edition of 100 copies – with contributions by Amanda Earl, Derek Beaulieu, Kyle Flemmer (Canada), Anatol Knotek (Austria), Andreas Bülhoff, Moritz Grünke, psw (Germany), Rosaire Appel (USA), Fatima Queiroz (Brasilia), Anthony Etherin, Barrie Tullett (UK), Pete Spence (Australia), Joakim Norling, Lina Nordenström (Sweden) and Jesus Morentin (Spain).

Derek Beaulieu

Kyle Flemmer – Barcode Poems

Amanda Earl – The Vispo Bible: Genesis 42

Jesus Morentin – (48×96  48×72  48×24  36×54)

Barrie Tullett – Platen Rollin’

talking typography in norwich

November 22, 2018

Barrie was out and about at the Norwich University of the Arts at the beginning of November – talking typography, poetry, artists’ books, Dante’s Inferno and various other stuff as it occurred to him – the lecture also included a performance of ‘A Song For An Art School’. If you’ve ever experienced that – you’ll know it’s worth the price of entry alone…

Thank you to Glen Robinson for the invite, and for the students for turning up – a full house and a real joy to be there.

recovered/recorded

November 14, 2018

all alt. cover low

Philippa’s most recent collaboration with Tamar MacLellan is a small pair of concertina books that explore fragments of china that were unearthed whilst digging in the garden of a newly acquired house. Whilst much has been written on the subject of found pottery, there has been no substantiated conclusions as to why our gardens are littered with these (mainly) blue and white fragments. Having recovered in the region of 150 pieces from the garden, this book focuses on a small selection of a growing collection. The books are presented in an archive bag complete with record card and a fragment of china.

 

 

chatting and selling in london

November 14, 2018

table spf.jpg The Caseroom were happy to be able to attend the annual Small Publishers Fair at the Conway Hall in London at the weekend. Several new editions were on offer including a first outing for Philippa’s book about Enid Blyton Pinky Winky Doodle Doodle Dumm Dum and her recent collaboration with Tamar MacLellan  – a book called Recovered/Recorded. Barrie’s new edition of Gun Dog was also released. Thank you to everyone who was willing to engage in conversation about buried objects and completed questionnaires, and a big thank youto all the people who purchased our books.

LENvention 6

September 4, 2018

gpcIn August Philippa attended the annual LENvention workshop organised by Angie Butler (ABPress). The two day event is an opportunity for a group of letterpress practitioners get together to develop a body of work within a 48 hour period. The event was hosted by Lucy Guenot at Gloucestershire Print Cooperative, a lovely print facility in Stroud.
http://www.gpchq.co.uk

This year the group were joined by Jeff Rathermel – executive director at Minnesota Center for Book Arts, as they developed a series of artists’ books that responded to the theme of bookness (or bookishness).

pinky winky doodle doodle dum dumm

July 11, 2018

When a colleague recently offered Philippa six Enid Blyton editions from the 50s she jumped at the chance to take them, seeing it as an opportunity to develop further work around the altered book genre.

The initial intention was to highlight childhood memories of reading Enid Blyton, however it soon became clear that opinions of the books had changed in recent years with Blyton receiving a lot of negative press; eventually it was the reviews of the novels that became the basis of the project.

Using online sources, each unfavorable comment relating to Enid’s novels was recorded and a system devised where the more recurrent the word, the larger it would appear. The 1958 edition of Five get in a Fix was carefully taken apart and divided into 12 sequential sections, using the system of scale each of the found words were over-printed onto the original pages causing the content to be gradually obliterated.

The title of the book is taken from an internal memo written in 1938 by Jean Sutcliffe – Head of the BBC Schools Department, which was not particularly complimentary about Blyton’s work: ‘There is rather a lot of the Pinky-winky-Doodle-doodle Dum-dumm type of name (and lots of pixies) in the original tales’.

pan pan

June 19, 2018

Philippa is pleased to be working with Angie Butler of ABPress again, on a collaborative project – entitled While you were sleeping. The project is the brainchild of Sara Burgess, who is hoping to get 100 presses from around the world to participate. Here she highlights the idea:

‘I propose a project to highlight those events that rock our every day. That makes me afraid for the future my five-year-old faces. That makes me ashamed of my privilege. That makes me cry when he can’t hear me. That depletes me, on behalf of our defenseless planet. That makes me fear the new treatment that women will face. That makes me say what the fuck, what the fuck, what the fuck. Just how does someone get away with this?
I call on the letterpress community to join me in print. To return to the truth. To print in facts, images, and lead type. Because in our type, we can convey beauty and messages,
and call attention to ugliness in ways that nobody else can.’

The brief was to select a newspaper headline from the past year, then set it and print it 100 times. Once they had selected their headline and made some joint design decisions, Angie worked independently on the first colour. On receipt of the prints, Philippa responded to the design/composition by overprinting.

poem of the day

May 28, 2018

Not that we’re out of the loop – but we’ve just found out we were yesterday’s poem of the day on the National Poetry Library website:

The image is taken from Brenda Dermody‘s folder of ‘remixes’ of Barrie’s original typographic illustrations for Dante’s Divine Comedy. These were created especially for the exhibition at the National Print Museum in Dublin.

The full set of four prints can be seen here: http://the-case.co.uk/dante-the-remixes.html

all mouth and falmouth

May 1, 2018

Barrie was recently asked to speak at the Mouth: Poetry and Illustration Forum in Falmouth. And, as he has a mouth, studied illustration and is in a book of 21st Century Concrete Poets, he readily accepted.

Seriously well organised, it came with a Forum pack and…

… an audience.

 

It was a fantastic event, chaired by the exceptional Allyson Hallett. An absolute joy to be a part of, although he had to leave early in order to get back to Lincoln. Which it turns out, is a very, very long way from Falmouth. Especially when the trains stop running for five hours due to a breakdown.

As part of his narrative about Poetry, illustration and the Typographic Dante, he digressed to talk about the Dante’s Inferno game for the XBox. Which, much to his surprise had some interesting moral questions at its heart, once you’d got over Dante changing from a gentle poet to one man crusading war machine that is… however, he still had some qualms about the game mechanics and the abilities to hack and slash your way through the narrative. He thought a more accurate set-up for the game controller would be this one:

Note to game devlelopers – he’s already worked out some of the gameplay mechanics, so do get in touch.

His previous talk, on a very cold January morning, was to the New Monday Art Group at the Usher Gallery here in Lincoln. A slightly smaller event, but one that was a lot easier to get home from.