Archive for the ‘book release’ Category

inferno and purgatory

June 14, 2019

Regular readers of our blog will know that Barrie has been working on an ongoing project for the last 30 years – and counting.

The Typographic Dante (currently on show at the National Poetry Library in London’s South Bank Centre) is a series of typographic illustrations – one for each of the 100 cantos of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

The 34 illustrations for The Inferno are made with Letterpress…

And the 33 illustrations for Purgatory are all made with Typewriters (and a number of coloured ribbons).

Paradise is still in progress (19 more cantos to go) and each one of those is created with Letraset.

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danteggiare

June 14, 2019

Barrie’s latest Artists’ Book Danteggiare is a collection of translations into English of the first terza rima of Dante’s Inferno. It was inspired by a comment made by Chris McCabe at the National Poetry Library during the installation of The Typographic Dante exhibition.

The title is from an article written for Bookanista by Mika Provata-Carlone.

The book contains 94 translations from 1782–2018. The fact it took over 450 years to be translated into English is considered, in some part, to be due to Dante’s Catholic views being at odds with Protestant English audiences, who would have seen his vision of the afterlife as heretical.

The book is not complete – first three lines of about 20 translations currently elude Barrie. Eventually, they’ll be included in a second edition of the book – if you happen to have copies of the following editions to hand, please e-mail him and let him know what the first three lines are…

1862 William Patrick Wilkie

1895 Robert Urquhart

1898 Eugene Jacob Lee-Hamilton

1901 John Carpenter Garnier

1903 Edward Wilberforce

1911 Charles Edwin Wheeler

1914 Edith Mary Shaw

1915 Edward Joshua Edwardes

1922 Henry John Hooper

1931 Lacy Lockert

1948 Patrick Cummins

1949 Harry Morgan Ayres

1954 Howard Russell Huse

1956 Glen Levin Swiggett

1958 Mary Prentice Lillie

1962 Clara Stillman Reed

1965 William F. Ennis

1965 Aldo Maugeri

the magazine: march

June 14, 2019

The Caseroom Press has just published the third part of Alan Mason’s The Magazine – A Novel in Thirteen Parts.

The Magazine follows the form, and manner of a Victorian serial. This artist’s book/novel plays out in thirteen distinct, and distinctive instalments replete with cliff-hangers, poems, letters of complaint, improving articles, amendments, announcements, plagiarisms of no great account and tall tales that fall short.

The project is supported by the Edinburgh College of Art and copies are available from the author.

alan[dot]mason[at]ed[dot]ac[dot]uk

 

recovered/recorded

November 14, 2018

all alt. cover low

Philippa’s most recent collaboration with Tamar MacLellan is a small pair of concertina books that explore fragments of china that were unearthed whilst digging in the garden of a newly acquired house. Whilst much has been written on the subject of found pottery, there has been no substantiated conclusions as to why our gardens are littered with these (mainly) blue and white fragments. Having recovered in the region of 150 pieces from the garden, this book focuses on a small selection of a growing collection. The books are presented in an archive bag complete with record card and a fragment of china.

 

 

chatting and selling in london

November 14, 2018

table spf.jpg The Caseroom were happy to be able to attend the annual Small Publishers Fair at the Conway Hall in London at the weekend. Several new editions were on offer including a first outing for Philippa’s book about Enid Blyton Pinky Winky Doodle Doodle Dumm Dum and her recent collaboration with Tamar MacLellan  – a book called Recovered/Recorded. Barrie’s new edition of Gun Dog was also released. Thank you to everyone who was willing to engage in conversation about buried objects and completed questionnaires, and a big thank youto all the people who purchased our books.

pinky winky doodle doodle dum dumm

July 11, 2018

When a colleague recently offered Philippa six Enid Blyton editions from the 50s she jumped at the chance to take them, seeing it as an opportunity to develop further work around the altered book genre.

The initial intention was to highlight childhood memories of reading Enid Blyton, however it soon became clear that opinions of the books had changed in recent years with Blyton receiving a lot of negative press; eventually it was the reviews of the novels that became the basis of the project.

Using online sources, each unfavorable comment relating to Enid’s novels was recorded and a system devised where the more recurrent the word, the larger it would appear. The 1958 edition of Five get in a Fix was carefully taken apart and divided into 12 sequential sections, using the system of scale each of the found words were over-printed onto the original pages causing the content to be gradually obliterated.

The title of the book is taken from an internal memo written in 1938 by Jean Sutcliffe – Head of the BBC Schools Department, which was not particularly complimentary about Blyton’s work: ‘There is rather a lot of the Pinky-winky-Doodle-doodle Dum-dumm type of name (and lots of pixies) in the original tales’.

windham re-worked

December 6, 2017

 

In September 2016 Philippa and Tamar MacLellan were invited to be part of an exhibition entitled Illuminating the discarded library (working title).The premise of the project was to select a book to alter from a collection of discarded library books previously housed within Christchurch College Library. Whilst they agreed to participate, neither artist was particularly interested in the altered book genre, therefore it was not until April this year that they began to develop the project. Having selected a pair of books The Windham Papers Volumes I and II* from the given list – they set out to explore whether or not working independently, to set of collaboratively devised rules and instructions, would affect or compromise creativity. Over an eight month period they took it in turns to each set an instruction, that used the book content as the basis for exploration and alteration.

The responses were made independently of each other and as the project developed each instruction enforced change upon the book in terms of form, function, appearance and identity.   The whole process was recorded and can be seen on:

https://meetinginthemiddleblog.wordpress.com

The books will be on display in the newly titled exhibition Ex Libris: Altered Books at Bucks County Museum, Aylesbury from 9 December 2017 – 24 February 2018

lost property

June 28, 2017

Philippa would like to thank the gentleman at BABE 2017 who gave her the idea for this book… Lost & Found follows on from a previous edition called On the Line, but this time uses left over train tickets and a 1974 Southern Region timetable to form a maze book that documents all the weird and wonderful items left on the London Transport system. This is probably the smallest book in the Caseroom catalogue, measuring just 45 x 55mm

revised edition a+e*i=o:u/

June 22, 2017

Philippa has recently been collaborating with Tamar MacLellan on a submission for the call for entries theme of Intersect by we love your books. The coincidental chance purchases (on the same day) of two charity shop embroidery books, one type based, the other pattern based, by the two artists led to a project that aimed to use a simple system to develop a single book.

Entitled Revised Edition, a typewriter symbol was allocated to each of the five vowels. The key enabled us to interpret the text through the development of a series of patterns typed on top of the pages from one of the existing books. This entire process meant that the book pages were sent back and forth several times, as each person typed their particular sections, at one point 6 pages were lost in the post(!)… so the book has 6 blank pages.


The final publication uses pattern sections as end-papers, and one of the existing covers was overprinted and trimmed enabling us to utilize it as new covers.

For more information on this and other collaborative work: https://meetinginthemiddleblog.wordpress.com

 

type tells tales

May 8, 2017

Many, many months ago we were approached by someone working for Steven Heller to see if we were interested in having some work published in a new book he was producing with Gail Anderson – needless to say we jumped at the chance – and last week the rather wonderful Type Tells Tales arrived on our desk. We feel honoured to be in such company as Werkman, Sam Winston, Paula Scher, Robert Massin, Marian Bantjes and many more type heroes and heroines.