Archive for the ‘collections’ Category

eye 100

June 13, 2020

Last Tuesday (or was it this Tuesday? All the days are the same now), as a result of collecting every issue of Eye magazine since issue one, Barrie was asked to take part in Type Tuesday: Eye 100. The launch for the 100th issue of the magazine (There was a clue in the title wasn’t there?).

Although he was delighted to be taking part in the event, he was slightly embarrassed that he was there simply because of his ability to buy a magazine every time it came out (He also has a complete collection of large-format baselines and all 8 issues of Octavo. He’s missing issues 1 & 2 of Emigre if anyone’s interested).

While Teal Triggs spoke very articulately about the nature of design and design education, Barrie stuck to the joys of sniffing fresh print.

Here he is in his moment of fame – captured through the magic of an Instagram Story or two (thank you to Maz and Joe for the mentions).

He’s looked better to be fair…

The 3rd year students on the Graphic Design Course at the University of Lincoln get an Eye subscription (Part of the Eye on Campus scheme), and it’s used as a very valuable teaching tool. There’s an article about it on the Eye Blog if you’re interested in further reading.

2 minutes of type

June 12, 2020

Last weekend (or was it the weekend before? The days are all the same now….), The St. Bride Foundation put out a call for Letterpress Artists and designers to provide a two-minute tour of their print studio as part of the St Bride Foundation’s Virtual Wayzgoose.

However, The Caseroom is as locked-down and as out of bounds as most of the rest of the country – so he put together a two-minute talk about his work instead. Although it was more like three minutes if he’s honest. He was going to try and re-record it to get it down to two minutes, but he’d already recorded about 12 takes and just gave up and pressed send on the video.

Here’s Becky Chilcott introducing the event.

See the St. Bride Foundation Vimeo account for about fifteen different two minutes’ worth of letterpress delights.

erdinger and shrdlu

June 12, 2020

Only anecdotal evidence exists of Erdinger’s oeuvre. It suggests that Erdinger – a mononymous concrete poet – was obsessed by his own name to the exclusion of all else. Driven by a desire to communicate something that was ‘unsayable’, Erdinger’s life was blighted by the fact that no one understood him or his work – and he remains to this day – a sound poet who’s work is clouded in obscurity. It seems that although he is mentioned in key papers, he never committed his work to print. He even seems to have chosen his collaborators purely in order to remain obscure, working with the equally enigmatic Etaoin Shrdlu, who’s sound poems appear as early as 1894(!), but who – as with Erdinger – seems to have left no great record of her art. Their collaborative piece still remains one of the great lost works of the concrete/sound poetry movement. Recently discovered behind a radiator in the Lyrik Kabinett, Munich, the pamphlet that you are holding, is based on a ‘bootleg’ chap-book of a performance Erdinger gave in 1964. It was clearly produced by an unknown admirer without Erdinger’s permission as an exhaustive search of the catalogue has found no further printed matter. There is, however, one incomplete audio recording, in which we hear the interviewer refer to Erdinger ‘speaking with a charming Liverpool accent’, unfortunately the tape is corrupted before the man himself begins his performance. Those who attended the Klang Farben Text event in Munich may have been lucky enough to have heard Chris McCabe perform two of the pieces. The first time they have been heard in over 50 years. We hope the rediscovery of this small example of his singular voice brings you as much pleasure as it brings us.

 

Etaoin Shrdlu. A name shrouded in mystery. Her work appears as early as 1894, and the last recorded instance in print is in 1976. A sound poet, who pre-dates the Futurist and Dadaist vanguards who are to this day considered the pioneers of the movement, her work only ever appeared as almost ‘interventionist’ statements in contemporary newspapers. Always credited to her by name, but never put in any other context, and dropped into the existing text matter seemingly at random, they could, and would be, overlooked for a century and a half. There is a known, but lost collaboration with Erdinger, and third-hand anecdotal evidence of a conversation between the two where Shrdlu spoke about the codes that underpinned her seemingly random sound poetry. We cannot even be sure how these statements were trans-lated, whether the printed versions are Shrdlu’s own, or transcripts by audience members… And what was her relationship with the elusive Erdinger? Mentor? Mother? Lover? An accidental coming together of two artists’ who sat outside of convention their entire lives? It cannot be an accident that these two impossible figures came to know each other. There must be some greater link than a random connection within an infinite universe. We can assume that Shrdlu must have been an active sound poet until her final years, that she must have died a centenarian, and that Erdinger who was first active in the 60s, was a much younger man. They are impossible figures to reconcile within the context of their art. What do the texts mean? What are the coded messages? Did Erdinger know the truth? Why do the first and last poems – some 80 years apart – start with that powerful connection of the ampersand? A character that implies a close connection between two parts. But all we have is that singular ‘t’. Alone. Unknown. Unknowing.

the lyrik kabinett

June 11, 2020

In early March – Chris McCabe, the Head Librarian at the Poetry Library in London, invited Barrie to Munich to take part in an international visual poetry event called ‘Klang Farben Text‘. The collaborative event, which paired up six British Poets and six German poets, was held in the absolutely wonderful Lyrik Kabinett – a poetry library and exhibition/performance space which is truly magical.

Set back from the street, in its own courtyard space, the Kabinett is one of curiosity and absolute delights.

As well as a formal library of poetry books (Its collection of 20,000 volumes is being expanded systematically) the display cabinets are full of artists’ books and objects.

Once the world turns and things are normal again – if you are in Munich, make a special trip to the Lyrik Kabinett. Once the world turns and things are normal again, if you are not in Munich, then make a special trip to Munich to make a special trip to the Lyrik Kabinett…

Josua Reichert’s Letterpress prints on the wall of the reception area.

This has nothing to do with the Lyrik Kabinett or the Klang Farben Text Festival, but round the corner was the most wonderful shop selling artists’ pigments and brushes.

366

October 15, 2019

Back in the Summer, Barrie was lucky enough to be one of the designers chosen to contribute to Fedrigoni 366.

The book’s launching in November, so he’ll have to wait until then to see his piece in print – and how it sits with the other works.

poem of the day

May 28, 2018

Not that we’re out of the loop – but we’ve just found out we were yesterday’s poem of the day on the National Poetry Library website:

The image is taken from Brenda Dermody‘s folder of ‘remixes’ of Barrie’s original typographic illustrations for Dante’s Divine Comedy. These were created especially for the exhibition at the National Print Museum in Dublin.

The full set of four prints can be seen here: http://the-case.co.uk/dante-the-remixes.html

Voyage Boxed bagged

April 14, 2016

sngma copy

 

Good news this week as Voyage Boxed, which has featured regularly on this blog, was purchased by the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh. This is quite a coup for all involved but congratulations to Imi and Rona who initiated and curated the project. It’s great to be part of such a successful collaboration.

to thine own self be true

November 9, 2015

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The Caseroom Press were at the Small Publishers Book Fair at Conway Hall on Friday and Saturday. We had a number of new books on display, plus posters and postcards, with Barrie giving a talk about Utopian Tales, ‘the most ambitious collaboration we’ve never published’, (although he’s hoping to change that quite soon).

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We caught up with old friends, met some new folk and are very pleased to announce that our books were bought for a number of collections including the Poetry Library, UWE, the Slade, the V&A and The Tate.

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One of the people we met worked for the University of Brighton on the Books Arts course, and it would appear that they were so impressed that they wrote this very succinct appreciation of us: http://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/hg2/2015/11/09/the-caseroom-press/

As if all that excitement wasn’t enough, a piece that Barrie wrote for COLDFRONTSingular Vispo :: First Encounters – about his introduction into Visual Poetry, and the piece of work that changed the way he saw language (HN Werkman’s The Next Call) has just gone live. The forty responses will be rolled out in groups of five each over the coming weeks. Along with Barrie’s thoughts are Brian Reed on Mary Ellen Solt, Louis Bury on bpNichol, Aram Saroyan on Ian Hamilton Finlay, and Orchid Tierney on Alison Knowles & James Tenney…

And just to top it all off, long time Caseroom Press collaborator Ken Cockburn’s translation of Suche, by Christine Marendon is in The Guardian today. Ken’s translation received a commendation in the recently announced results of the 2015 Stephen Spender prize.

voyage boxed – sold and on show

July 20, 2015

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Voyage boxed – the collaborative project of Imi Maufe and Rona Rangsch, which Philippa – along with seventeen other artists – contributed to back in early 2014 is being exhibited as part of 35 works at Kaleid London 2015 which opened on 18 July. In addition, the work has been purchased by the Manchester Metropolitan University Library Collection.

http://www.kaleideditions.com

barrie’s book is in a book…

October 31, 2014

REPRINT

Some time ago, back in 2011 in fact, we had an e-mail from Dr. Annette Gilbert. She said that she was organising a conference and writing about ‘Appropriated Literatures’ and she wondered if we could send a copy of The Ghost in the Fog for inclusion in the book.

Well. The book – Reprint Appropriation (&) Literature is now out in the bookshops, and Annette kindly sent us a copy – and a very fine thing it is indeed.

The Ghost in the Fog (cover)

The Ghost in the Fog (spreads)

 

The Ghost in the Fog is in very good company, the book has a huge amount of works covering many different forms of appropriation – as she saysSince the 1960s, writers have radically challenged the notion of originality and creativity in literature. They stopped writing new texts for their books and instead drew upon pre-existing books: canonical texts of world literature or intellectual history are transcribed by hand, edited, altered, alphabetically arranged or simply copied and republished under one’s own name. By now Appropriation Literature amounts to a critical mass that has generated its own tradition. The present anthology is the first to give an international overview of the phenomenon, presenting 126 books and projects by over 90 authors.

Included is Derek Beaulieu’s Flatland (which, as you may know, is one of Barrie’s favourite books).

Flatland

 

And of course the great Tom Phillips’ A HUMUMENT

Tom Phillips

 

It also includes a work based on another book close to Barrie’s heart: In this Dark Wood by Elisabeth Tonnard. The book ‘is a modern gothic’, Tonnard paired ‘images of people walking alone in night-time city streets with 90 different English translations collected from the first lines of Dante’s Inferno’.

 

This Dark Wood

 

There are a host of other works in the book, and to choose one above another would be doing Annettes’s encyclopaedic research a disservice. So, delve in. The book is available on Amazon. Just one click away…

And no, we’re not on commission.