Archive for the ‘dante’ Category

longer in london

July 1, 2019

The Typographic Dante will be on show in London throughout the Summer.

The show is still on in the foyer outside the National Poetry Library and in the Members Lounge.

A big thank you to Chris McCabe and Paul O’Sullivan of the South Bank Centre for supporting the exhibition.

london’s best design event(s)

June 23, 2019

It’s official. Not only free (and cheap) but one of London’s best design events.

The Typographic Dante is on at the South Bank Centre until the end of the month.

More events can be found here: https://www.designcalendar.io/london/events.

And don’t forget, when you get there…

Thanks to Catherine Dixon for the photo.

inferno and purgatory

June 14, 2019

Regular readers of our blog will know that Barrie has been working on an ongoing project for the last 30 years – and counting.

The Typographic Dante (currently on show at the National Poetry Library in London’s South Bank Centre) is a series of typographic illustrations – one for each of the 100 cantos of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

The 34 illustrations for The Inferno are made with Letterpress…

And the 33 illustrations for Purgatory are all made with Typewriters (and a number of coloured ribbons).

Paradise is still in progress (19 more cantos to go) and each one of those is created with Letraset.

danteggiare

June 14, 2019

Barrie’s latest Artists’ Book Danteggiare is a collection of translations into English of the first terza rima of Dante’s Inferno. It was inspired by a comment made by Chris McCabe at the National Poetry Library during the installation of The Typographic Dante exhibition.

The title is from an article written for Bookanista by Mika Provata-Carlone.

The book contains 94 translations from 1782–2018. The fact it took over 450 years to be translated into English is considered, in some part, to be due to Dante’s Catholic views being at odds with Protestant English audiences, who would have seen his vision of the afterlife as heretical.

The book is not complete – first three lines of about 20 translations currently elude Barrie. Eventually, they’ll be included in a second edition of the book – if you happen to have copies of the following editions to hand, please e-mail him and let him know what the first three lines are…

1862 William Patrick Wilkie

1895 Robert Urquhart

1898 Eugene Jacob Lee-Hamilton

1901 John Carpenter Garnier

1903 Edward Wilberforce

1911 Charles Edwin Wheeler

1914 Edith Mary Shaw

1915 Edward Joshua Edwardes

1922 Henry John Hooper

1931 Lacy Lockert

1948 Patrick Cummins

1949 Harry Morgan Ayres

1954 Howard Russell Huse

1956 Glen Levin Swiggett

1958 Mary Prentice Lillie

1962 Clara Stillman Reed

1965 William F. Ennis

1965 Aldo Maugeri

bookanista

May 10, 2019

A very big thank you to Mika Provata-Carlone – a Dante scholar, translator, editor and illustrator – for her very thoughtful and insightful review of The Typographic Dante exhibition over at Bookanista: http://bookanista.com/vision-eternity/.

Having worked on the project independently for so long, it was quite wonderful to discuss it in depth with someone who has such a deep understanding of Dante and the Divine Comedy. As you may know, Barrie discovered Dante’s Inferno through pop culture as a teenager and has never formally studied the life of Dante or the Divine Comedy, even though Dante has been with him as an ongoing project for 30 years now.

At the opening of the show, Barrie also met some medievalists from the British Library and the talk (and performance) inspired Philobiblon, [(on) the love of books], to write a blog post about the first printed editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

Interestingly enough, the blog post mentions that as a medievalist, he rarely thinks of the printed history of Dante’s (Divine) Comedy – as a typographer Barrie rarely thought of the manuscripts of the Divine Comedy, until very recently. The British Library online archive (http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/) is a stunning resource and has inspired Barrie to look a little further back into history than his role as a graphic designer and lecturer usually takes him.

He would recommend the following books if you find it all as interesting as he does: Books Before Print by Erik Kwakkel and The Book by Keith Houston.

The Typographic Dante Show is on at the National Poetry Library, South Bank Center until the 30th June.

 

 

 

tocall number 4

May 8, 2019

The very talented Petra Schulze-Wollgast (psw) has just published issue 4 of ToCall magazine.

With work by Andrew Topel (USA), Christine Walde (Canada), David Armes (USA), David Chirot (USA), Derek Beaulieu (Canada), Enzo Patti (Italy), Fernando Aguiar (Portugal), Gary Barwin (Canada), Hiromi Suzuki (Japan), Johanna Drucker (USA), Kate Siklosi (Canada), Matthew Robertson (UK), May Bery (Canada), Naomi Kent (UK), psw (Germany), Volodymyr Bilyk (Ukraine) and our very own Barrie Tullett (UK) … the magazine is a celebration of work primarily created with analogue techniques. 

More of psw’s work can be seen here:http://www.psw.gallery/

the typographic bloody dante

May 4, 2019

The Typographic Dante opened at the National Poetry Library on Tuesday night. A sold-out gig, Barrie took the opportunity to wax lyrical about Dante in popular culture, explain what else he’d been up to in the 30 years he’d been working on the project, and performed old favourites ‘Dead Birds’ and ‘A Song for an Art School’, as well as finding room to include some new material.

A big thank you to Chris McCabe for making the exhibition happen, and Dan, Dani and Mark for their technical support in hanging the show.

It’s an incredible venue and an absolute delight to be able to exhibit the work there.

https://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whats-on/134923-typographic-dante-2019

 

the typographic dante at the south bank centre

February 23, 2019

The Typographic Dante will have its London debut at the National Poetry Library, South Bank Centre this April.

30 years in the making, and counting, the exhibition will showcase illustrations from Inferno, Purgatory and Paradise.

As always, Barrie is at pains to point out that he has been busy with other projects as well as this one, but despite his glacial pace of progress he has finally dipped his toe into Paradise, the final book of the Divine Comedy.

DATES & TIMES: 30 Apr 2019–30 Jun 2019

WHERE: National Poetry Library, Level 5, Blue side, Royal Festival Hall.

For more information – see The South Bank Centre website.

https://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whats-on/134924-typographic-dante-opening-event-2019

https://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whats-on/134923-typographic-dante-2019

paradise… at last

February 7, 2019

Those of you who know Barrie will also know that he’s been working on a very long term project called The Typographic Dante. He’s always at pains to point out that he has been busy with other projects, but the truth of it is, he made the first print back in 1989 and has worked on it on and off ever since.

However. Finally. After 30 years, he‘s managed to complete the Letterpress and Typewriter illustrations for Inferno and Purgatory and has finally dipped his toes in the Letraset illustrations for Paradise.

Paradise: Canto I – The glory of the One who moves all things / permeates the universe and glows / in one part more and in another less.

Paradise: Canto V – such were the far more than a thousand splendours / I saw approaching us, and each declared: / ‘Here now is one who will increase our loves.’

Each of the three processes has given him particular challenges to overcome – the limitations and restrictions inherent in each of the now ‘dead’ technologies. One issue for the Paradise pieces is not only the finite amount of dry transfer sheets he has but their age. Already some of the sheets are crumbling away as they are used. And several sheets (admittedly from an inferior supplier) no longer have any glue on the letterforms, so the careful burnishing may well release the character from the carrier sheet, but in then simply falls off the paper and leaves no trace.

The other unexpected joy is the discovery of some wonderful type sheets…

And the odd youthful misstep.

Oh. The. Shame.

(There’s actually a really interesting article about Chris Costello and the story behind Papyrus here.)

poem of the day

May 28, 2018

Not that we’re out of the loop – but we’ve just found out we were yesterday’s poem of the day on the National Poetry Library website:

The image is taken from Brenda Dermody‘s folder of ‘remixes’ of Barrie’s original typographic illustrations for Dante’s Divine Comedy. These were created especially for the exhibition at the National Print Museum in Dublin.

The full set of four prints can be seen here: http://the-case.co.uk/dante-the-remixes.html