Archive for the ‘education’ Category

eye 100

June 13, 2020

Last Tuesday (or was it this Tuesday? All the days are the same now), as a result of collecting every issue of Eye magazine since issue one, Barrie was asked to take part in Type Tuesday: Eye 100. The launch for the 100th issue of the magazine (There was a clue in the title wasn’t there?).

Although he was delighted to be taking part in the event, he was slightly embarrassed that he was there simply because of his ability to buy a magazine every time it came out (He also has a complete collection of large-format baselines and all 8 issues of Octavo. He’s missing issues 1 & 2 of Emigre if anyone’s interested).

While Teal Triggs spoke very articulately about the nature of design and design education, Barrie stuck to the joys of sniffing fresh print.

Here he is in his moment of fame – captured through the magic of an Instagram Story or two (thank you to Maz and Joe for the mentions).

He’s looked better to be fair…

The 3rd year students on the Graphic Design Course at the University of Lincoln get an Eye subscription (Part of the Eye on Campus scheme), and it’s used as a very valuable teaching tool. There’s an article about it on the Eye Blog if you’re interested in further reading.

2 minutes of type

June 12, 2020

Last weekend (or was it the weekend before? The days are all the same now….), The St. Bride Foundation put out a call for Letterpress Artists and designers to provide a two-minute tour of their print studio as part of the St Bride Foundation’s Virtual Wayzgoose.

However, The Caseroom is as locked-down and as out of bounds as most of the rest of the country – so he put together a two-minute talk about his work instead. Although it was more like three minutes if he’s honest. He was going to try and re-record it to get it down to two minutes, but he’d already recorded about 12 takes and just gave up and pressed send on the video.

Here’s Becky Chilcott introducing the event.

See the St. Bride Foundation Vimeo account for about fifteen different two minutes’ worth of letterpress delights.

book fairs in paradise

June 11, 2020

So. February turned out nice – and busy.

In January, Iain Morrison at the Fruitmarket Gallery had asked Barrie if he’d like to exhibit the entire 100 cantos of The Divine Comedy as part of their annual book fair (which of course he did, and it also turned out to be the final push he needed to complete the entire project).

So, he spent a fair amount of time in his studio with very old sheets of Letraset (that’s a whole other story) and then had a frantic week packaging the entire show up ready to go to Edinburgh (in between that teaching lark of course).

This was probably the weekend before the world turned, and, of course, Barrie didn’t get to go and take part in the book fair, or see his own show.

He’d been away in Munich as part of an international poetry festival earlier that week (true) and couldn’t get up to Edinburgh in time. And of course, we’ve all been in lockdown ever since, so he missed out on it all. Doomed to forever be in the boarding lounge of the good ship Zeitgeist.

Caseroom Press collaborators, Alan Mason and Ken Cockburn were there of course (here’s Alan describing the one that got away).

And Barrie was eventually there (rather aptly) in spirit, for the Fruitmarket Gallery’s first online event.

Iain and Barrie spoke about the work and read selections from Dante’s Inferno using the prints as their Virgil-like guide. Guests were invited to grab their own editions or translations of the text and join in, or just log-in on the night and listen as they descended into the circles of hell. Iain might even invite him back to walk up the mountain of Purgatory together.

Initially scheduled to finish at the end of March, the show has far extended it’s run, and is still on, playing to an empty house every day. Barrie takes great pride in thinking that it is one of those rarest of things – an exhibition that has been extended by unpopular demand.

talking dante in sleaford

October 13, 2019

Barrie was talking about his Typographic Dante Project in Sleaford yesterday – the show is on its last day today, so rush to the NCCD if you’d still like to catch it – or if you’re in London, selected work from the series is still on display at the Members Lounge in the South Bank Centre.

It’s also the last chance to catch a wonderful exhibition of Artists’ Books from the University of Lincoln – the results of Jantze Holmes’ book arts workshops with various courses from the College of Arts.

 

creatively inspiring

August 7, 2019

Barrie’s been featured on the Creative Review Website – as part of their Creative Inspiration pages.

The article features some thoughts about the Dante project, teaching at Lincoln, and the duality of progress and loss.

The Typographic Dante is currently on at the National Centre for Design and Craft, and the Southbank Centre.

talking about the design of poetry

July 22, 2019

The Poetry by Design Symposium at Leeds University made for a fascinating day. Fiona Becket (above) and Emma Trott chaired the panel sessions – and there was a wealth of insight from the speakers, as well as a fascinating selection of work as part of the exhibition.

 

Photo by Bronac Ferran

Barrie was the first speaker of the day and amongst other things, discussed the difficulty of ‘drawing’ fire with a typewriter.

Photo by Emma Trott

Photo by Bronac Ferran

And the particular advantages, and disadvantages of working with commercially ‘obsolete’ technologies(Believe it or not, he says he’d actually ironed that shirt).

The day ended with a series of performances, including the extremely powerful MOTHERBABYHOME by Kimberly Campanello.

In other news – The Typographic Dante was mentioned in an interview with Chris Warren (part of the Poetry Mini Interviews Blog) – he mentioned Barrie in the same breath as Christian Bok and Derek Beaulieu, so praise indeed.

 

poetry by design: a re-appraisal of visual poetics

July 15, 2019

Barrie has been invited to speak at the Poetry By Design symposium on visual and concrete poetry. Its aim is to stimulate conversations about visual poetics from the immediate pre-computer period while also considering the present moment and the futures of visual poetry.

This event coincides with the exhibition, ‘Poetry By Design’, which is open now until 23rd August in the Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery, University of Leeds. Curated by Professor Fiona Becket and Dr Emma Trott, the exhibition displays work by poets including Bob Cobbing, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Dom Sylvester Houédard and Kimberly Campanello.

Please get in touch with Emma Trott with any questions: e.j.g.trott@leeds.ac.uk

Poetry By Design: schedule

9:30: Registration and coffee (Sheppard Room)

9:55: Welcome (Fiona Becket) (Education Room)

10:00: Panel I: (Education Room). Barrie Tullett – The Typographic Dante, Iris Colomb – Spill: showing and discussing a project between poetry and design

10:45: Panel II: (Education Room), Bronac Ferran – Hansjörg Mayer’s futura, Fiona Becket – Bob Cobbing, a British Internationalist, Natalie Ferris – The Intelligent Hand: Ana Hatherly and Visualising the Creative Act

12:00: Panel III: (Education Room), Julie Morrissy – “Looking and Listening”: Movement, Space, and Performance in Contemporary Irish Poetry, Florence Impens – The poem and the Archive: Kimberly Campanello’s MOTHERBABYHOME

12:45: Exhibition ‘tour’ and Q&A (Fiona Becket) (Education Room)

2pm: Panel IV: (Education Room), Alice Tarbuck – ‘‘An old frog/ jumps in’: Chinese and Japanese poetry in the work of Thomas A. Clark and Cid Corman’, Emma Trott – Language and Landscape: Simon Armitage’s Stanza Stones

2:45pm: Panel V: (Education Room), Greg Thomas – Poem Machines: Liliane Lijn, John Goodby – Purity, pop-up and performance: Peter Meilleur / Childe Roland and Anglo-Welsh-Quebecois concrete poetry

4pm: Roundtable (Workshop Theatre)

4:30pm: Readings: (Workshop Theatre), Sascha Aurora Akhtar, Vahni Capildeo, Kimberly Campanello

5:30pm: Finish

bookanista

May 10, 2019

A very big thank you to Mika Provata-Carlone – a Dante scholar, translator, editor and illustrator – for her very thoughtful and insightful review of The Typographic Dante exhibition over at Bookanista: http://bookanista.com/vision-eternity/.

Having worked on the project independently for so long, it was quite wonderful to discuss it in depth with someone who has such a deep understanding of Dante and the Divine Comedy. As you may know, Barrie discovered Dante’s Inferno through pop culture as a teenager and has never formally studied the life of Dante or the Divine Comedy, even though Dante has been with him as an ongoing project for 30 years now.

At the opening of the show, Barrie also met some medievalists from the British Library and the talk (and performance) inspired Philobiblon, [(on) the love of books], to write a blog post about the first printed editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

Interestingly enough, the blog post mentions that as a medievalist, he rarely thinks of the printed history of Dante’s (Divine) Comedy – as a typographer Barrie rarely thought of the manuscripts of the Divine Comedy, until very recently. The British Library online archive (http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/) is a stunning resource and has inspired Barrie to look a little further back into history than his role as a graphic designer and lecturer usually takes him.

He would recommend the following books if you find it all as interesting as he does: Books Before Print by Erik Kwakkel and The Book by Keith Houston.

The Typographic Dante Show is on at the National Poetry Library, South Bank Center until the 30th June.

 

 

 

talking typography in norwich

November 22, 2018

Barrie was out and about at the Norwich University of the Arts at the beginning of November – talking typography, poetry, artists’ books, Dante’s Inferno and various other stuff as it occurred to him – the lecture also included a performance of ‘A Song For An Art School’. If you’ve ever experienced that – you’ll know it’s worth the price of entry alone…

Thank you to Glen Robinson for the invite, and for the students for turning up – a full house and a real joy to be there.

primitive printing

October 26, 2016

rubberstampingcover

One of the nicest things about being part of The Caseroom Press is the larger community of people that it brings you into contact with. We’ve met so many wonderful people at book fairs, and, on occasion, got to work with them here at the University of Lincoln too. Angie Butler has become a regular collaborator with Philippa on her books, and runs (fantastic) book arts workshops with our students every year – and of course there’s Stephen Fowler, the go-to-guy for all your rubber stamping and primitive printing needs.

rubberstamping_stephen

Stephen has now taken some time out from printing things to write a book on that very subject – and very good it is too. It made Barrie want to quit this crazy typography lark and start stamping.

rubberstamping_robryan

With an introduction by Rob Ryan (praise indeed), the book covers all the materials and techniques you’ll need to start your own independent primitive print workshop.

rubber-stamping_materials

The book is full of beautiful examples, experiments and suggestions as to how you might develop your own practice and is awash with delights. The Illustrations include some very nice ‘freeform repeat patterns’ by none other than Jantze Tullett too.

rubberstamping_jantze

The book is available from Laurence King, or of course Amazon. We’d suggest that if you’re only going to buy one book this year, buy Typewriter Art: A Modern Anthology, but if you’re going to buy two books, buy Rubber Stamping as well.