Archive for the ‘poetry’ Category

today is a truly blessed day, i have found a typewriter and cannot leave.

July 13, 2019

The Typographic Dante exhibition at the NCCD is now open to the public, and it looks absolutely wonderful.

It really is a delight to have the work showcased in its own space at the gallery.

The vitrines contain examples of sketchbooks and development work going back three decades.

As well as various editions of the Divine Comedy and other books inspired by it (apologies for the shadow).

 

A (working) typewriter from Barrie’s collection is part of the show, and it has proven to be very popular with visitors to the gallery (see the example above for the title of this post). Apparently, a few of the younger members of the staff team did need an induction into how to use the machine (‘It’s got margins and tabs… like Word!’).

The show is on in the Roof Gallery (4th floor) until the 13th of October and Barrie will be talking about the project at the Poetry by Design symposium at the University of Leeds, this Thursday (18th July).

intriguing and peculiar

July 6, 2019

At the Southbank Centre, London, Barrie is currently ‘free and cheap’, and as of today, at the National Centre for Craft & Design, he’s ‘intriguing and peculiar’… and also one of Design Week’s Picks of the Month.

The Typographic Dante show is on at the South Bank Centre (Level 5 Lounge/Members Area) over the Summer and at the NCCD (4th Floor Gallery) until October.

https://nccd.org.uk/exhibitions/the-typographic-dante

As well as the typographic illustrations themselves, the exhibition at the NCCD contains some of the various editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy that Barrie has used as reference material and inspiration, his original sketchbooks from the Inferno and Purgatory series, examples of the materials he uses to create the images with – and – a typewriter should anyone feel the urge to make some art of their own.

national centre for craft and dante

July 2, 2019

The Typographic Dante exhibition is coming to the National Centre for Craft & Design (NCCD).

Opening on the 6th July, the show runs until the 13th October in the Roof Gallery on the 4th floor.

Work from the series is still on display in the South Bank Centre until September, which meant Barrie had to go through the entire set of prints going back 30 years to choose the set for the NCCD show.

He also took the opportunity to rework some pieces, including one of the earliest of the Purgatory images – Canto VII: The Rule of the Mountain. You can see a detail of the new illustration here, and the original drawing side by side with the new version.

On both occasions, the size of the sun was dictated by the roll of masking tape Barrie happened to have to hand. A new roll back in 2008 and an almost empty (different) roll in 2019.

It was also a chance to look at, reprint and extend the Paradise illustrations.

The work being prepped and sorted.

Ready for hanging.

Barrie would like to say a very big thank you to Lesley Farrell for inviting him to exhibit his work at the NCCD, to the University of Lincoln for their financial support, Bradley Oliver-White for his technical skills, and Jantze for being there to help select, frame and plan the hanging.

longer in london

July 1, 2019

The Typographic Dante will be on show in London throughout the Summer.

The show is still on in the foyer outside the National Poetry Library and in the Members Lounge.

A big thank you to Chris McCabe and Paul O’Sullivan of the South Bank Centre for supporting the exhibition.

london’s best design event(s)

June 23, 2019

It’s official. Not only free (and cheap) but one of London’s best design events.

The Typographic Dante is on at the South Bank Centre until the end of the month.

More events can be found here: https://www.designcalendar.io/london/events.

And don’t forget, when you get there…

Thanks to Catherine Dixon for the photo.

inferno and purgatory

June 14, 2019

Regular readers of our blog will know that Barrie has been working on an ongoing project for the last 30 years – and counting.

The Typographic Dante (currently on show at the National Poetry Library in London’s South Bank Centre) is a series of typographic illustrations – one for each of the 100 cantos of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

The 34 illustrations for The Inferno are made with Letterpress…

And the 33 illustrations for Purgatory are all made with Typewriters (and a number of coloured ribbons).

Paradise is still in progress (19 more cantos to go) and each one of those is created with Letraset.

danteggiare

June 14, 2019

Barrie’s latest Artists’ Book Danteggiare is a collection of translations into English of the first terza rima of Dante’s Inferno. It was inspired by a comment made by Chris McCabe at the National Poetry Library during the installation of The Typographic Dante exhibition.

The title is from an article written for Bookanista by Mika Provata-Carlone.

The book contains 94 translations from 1782–2018. The fact it took over 450 years to be translated into English is considered, in some part, to be due to Dante’s Catholic views being at odds with Protestant English audiences, who would have seen his vision of the afterlife as heretical.

The book is not complete – first three lines of about 20 translations currently elude Barrie. Eventually, they’ll be included in a second edition of the book – if you happen to have copies of the following editions to hand, please e-mail him and let him know what the first three lines are…

1862 William Patrick Wilkie

1895 Robert Urquhart

1898 Eugene Jacob Lee-Hamilton

1901 John Carpenter Garnier

1903 Edward Wilberforce

1911 Charles Edwin Wheeler

1914 Edith Mary Shaw

1915 Edward Joshua Edwardes

1922 Henry John Hooper

1931 Lacy Lockert

1948 Patrick Cummins

1949 Harry Morgan Ayres

1954 Howard Russell Huse

1956 Glen Levin Swiggett

1958 Mary Prentice Lillie

1962 Clara Stillman Reed

1965 William F. Ennis

1965 Aldo Maugeri

carnival at birkbeck

June 14, 2019

Bronaċ Ferran recently organised a Reading and Discussion of Steve McCaffery’s Carnival at The Contemporary Poetics Research Centre (Birkbeck University).

After a reading/performance from Carnival by Steve McCaffery himself, there were responses by Karen Mac Cormack, Greg Thomas and Rebecca Kosick – as well as The Caseroom Press’ very own Barrie Tullett.

The event ended with a response to the comments and discussions by Steve McCaffery.

It was a fantastic evening, Barrie got to meet his heroes, and the papers by Greg and Rebecca were incredibly insightful. He just wanted to say a very big thank you to Bronaċ for organising it all and inviting him to be a part of it.

For more information on The Contemporary Poetics Research Centre see here: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/cprc/

For a list of forthcoming events see here: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/cprc/readings/

 

bookanista

May 10, 2019

A very big thank you to Mika Provata-Carlone – a Dante scholar, translator, editor and illustrator – for her very thoughtful and insightful review of The Typographic Dante exhibition over at Bookanista: http://bookanista.com/vision-eternity/.

Having worked on the project independently for so long, it was quite wonderful to discuss it in depth with someone who has such a deep understanding of Dante and the Divine Comedy. As you may know, Barrie discovered Dante’s Inferno through pop culture as a teenager and has never formally studied the life of Dante or the Divine Comedy, even though Dante has been with him as an ongoing project for 30 years now.

At the opening of the show, Barrie also met some medievalists from the British Library and the talk (and performance) inspired Philobiblon, [(on) the love of books], to write a blog post about the first printed editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

Interestingly enough, the blog post mentions that as a medievalist, he rarely thinks of the printed history of Dante’s (Divine) Comedy – as a typographer Barrie rarely thought of the manuscripts of the Divine Comedy, until very recently. The British Library online archive (http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/) is a stunning resource and has inspired Barrie to look a little further back into history than his role as a graphic designer and lecturer usually takes him.

He would recommend the following books if you find it all as interesting as he does: Books Before Print by Erik Kwakkel and The Book by Keith Houston.

The Typographic Dante Show is on at the National Poetry Library, South Bank Center until the 30th June.

 

 

 

the typographic dante at the south bank centre

February 23, 2019

The Typographic Dante will have its London debut at the National Poetry Library, South Bank Centre this April.

30 years in the making, and counting, the exhibition will showcase illustrations from Inferno, Purgatory and Paradise.

As always, Barrie is at pains to point out that he has been busy with other projects as well as this one, but despite his glacial pace of progress he has finally dipped his toe into Paradise, the final book of the Divine Comedy.

DATES & TIMES: 30 Apr 2019–30 Jun 2019

WHERE: National Poetry Library, Level 5, Blue side, Royal Festival Hall.

For more information – see The South Bank Centre website.

https://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whats-on/134924-typographic-dante-opening-event-2019

https://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whats-on/134923-typographic-dante-2019