Archive for the ‘publication’ Category

eye 100

June 13, 2020

Last Tuesday (or was it this Tuesday? All the days are the same now), as a result of collecting every issue of Eye magazine since issue one, Barrie was asked to take part in Type Tuesday: Eye 100. The launch for the 100th issue of the magazine (There was a clue in the title wasn’t there?).

Although he was delighted to be taking part in the event, he was slightly embarrassed that he was there simply because of his ability to buy a magazine every time it came out (He also has a complete collection of large-format baselines and all 8 issues of Octavo. He’s missing issues 1 & 2 of Emigre if anyone’s interested).

While Teal Triggs spoke very articulately about the nature of design and design education, Barrie stuck to the joys of sniffing fresh print.

Here he is in his moment of fame – captured through the magic of an Instagram Story or two (thank you to Maz and Joe for the mentions).

He’s looked better to be fair…

The 3rd year students on the Graphic Design Course at the University of Lincoln get an Eye subscription (Part of the Eye on Campus scheme), and it’s used as a very valuable teaching tool. There’s an article about it on the Eye Blog if you’re interested in further reading.

2 minutes of type

June 12, 2020

Last weekend (or was it the weekend before? The days are all the same now….), The St. Bride Foundation put out a call for Letterpress Artists and designers to provide a two-minute tour of their print studio as part of the St Bride Foundation’s Virtual Wayzgoose.

However, The Caseroom is as locked-down and as out of bounds as most of the rest of the country – so he put together a two-minute talk about his work instead. Although it was more like three minutes if he’s honest. He was going to try and re-record it to get it down to two minutes, but he’d already recorded about 12 takes and just gave up and pressed send on the video.

Here’s Becky Chilcott introducing the event.

See the St. Bride Foundation Vimeo account for about fifteen different two minutes’ worth of letterpress delights.

manifest 55

June 12, 2020

Barrie’s collaboration for Klang Farben Text was with the german writer, playwright and radio play director, FALKNER.

FALKNER sees her work, in whatever medium, as manifestos, so after discussing their project ideas, FALKNER wrote MANIFEST 55 for the event, and on the first day they worked out a typographic narrative in the format of a concertina book as a record their work together.

A film of a small mock-up of the book was played during their Klang Farben Text performance with the final concertina book to be made as a small edition that could be given to each of the contributors, as well as the British Council, National Poetry Library London and the Lyrik Kabinett.

However. The whole event took place about a week before social distancing laws came into effect, and, as a result of the current global pandemic and lock-down, the book currently exists as a series of unglued pages sitting in the Book Arts’ Space at the University of Lincoln. Quietly waiting for the world to turn again and ‘normal’ service to be resumed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

in print

September 11, 2019

Many thanks to Dr Sarah Bodman for her article, in this month’s Printmaking Today, about Philippa’s on going collaborative project with Tamar MacLellan. The project, which will eventually be formed of three editions is based around the theme of unearthed objects found within the domestic garden. So far the first two books have been completed – Recovered & Recorded and Kept, with the third now in the planning stage. Sarah’s article discusses their collaborative process.

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inferno and purgatory

June 14, 2019

Regular readers of our blog will know that Barrie has been working on an ongoing project for the last 30 years – and counting.

The Typographic Dante (currently on show at the National Poetry Library in London’s South Bank Centre) is a series of typographic illustrations – one for each of the 100 cantos of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

The 34 illustrations for The Inferno are made with Letterpress…

And the 33 illustrations for Purgatory are all made with Typewriters (and a number of coloured ribbons).

Paradise is still in progress (19 more cantos to go) and each one of those is created with Letraset.

tocall number 4

May 8, 2019

The very talented Petra Schulze-Wollgast (psw) has just published issue 4 of ToCall magazine.

With work by Andrew Topel (USA), Christine Walde (Canada), David Armes (USA), David Chirot (USA), Derek Beaulieu (Canada), Enzo Patti (Italy), Fernando Aguiar (Portugal), Gary Barwin (Canada), Hiromi Suzuki (Japan), Johanna Drucker (USA), Kate Siklosi (Canada), Matthew Robertson (UK), May Bery (Canada), Naomi Kent (UK), psw (Germany), Volodymyr Bilyk (Ukraine) and our very own Barrie Tullett (UK) … the magazine is a celebration of work primarily created with analogue techniques. 

More of psw’s work can be seen here:http://www.psw.gallery/

to call no1.

November 22, 2018

Barrie was delighted to be asked to contribute to the very talented Petra Schulze-Wollgast’s new magazine ToCall.

Inspired by the last issue of Tlaloc, published in 1970 and edited by Cavan McCarthy, ToCall was mimeo printed in an edition of 100 copies – with contributions by Amanda Earl, Derek Beaulieu, Kyle Flemmer (Canada), Anatol Knotek (Austria), Andreas Bülhoff, Moritz Grünke, psw (Germany), Rosaire Appel (USA), Fatima Queiroz (Brasilia), Anthony Etherin, Barrie Tullett (UK), Pete Spence (Australia), Joakim Norling, Lina Nordenström (Sweden) and Jesus Morentin (Spain).

Derek Beaulieu

Kyle Flemmer – Barcode Poems

Amanda Earl – The Vispo Bible: Genesis 42

Jesus Morentin – (48×96  48×72  48×24  36×54)

Barrie Tullett – Platen Rollin’

recovered/recorded

November 14, 2018

all alt. cover low

Philippa’s most recent collaboration with Tamar MacLellan is a small pair of concertina books that explore fragments of china that were unearthed whilst digging in the garden of a newly acquired house. Whilst much has been written on the subject of found pottery, there has been no substantiated conclusions as to why our gardens are littered with these (mainly) blue and white fragments. Having recovered in the region of 150 pieces from the garden, this book focuses on a small selection of a growing collection. The books are presented in an archive bag complete with record card and a fragment of china.

 

 

pinky winky doodle doodle dum dumm

July 11, 2018

When a colleague recently offered Philippa six Enid Blyton editions from the 50s she jumped at the chance to take them, seeing it as an opportunity to develop further work around the altered book genre.

The initial intention was to highlight childhood memories of reading Enid Blyton, however it soon became clear that opinions of the books had changed in recent years with Blyton receiving a lot of negative press; eventually it was the reviews of the novels that became the basis of the project.

Using online sources, each unfavorable comment relating to Enid’s novels was recorded and a system devised where the more recurrent the word, the larger it would appear. The 1958 edition of Five get in a Fix was carefully taken apart and divided into 12 sequential sections, using the system of scale each of the found words were over-printed onto the original pages causing the content to be gradually obliterated.

The title of the book is taken from an internal memo written in 1938 by Jean Sutcliffe – Head of the BBC Schools Department, which was not particularly complimentary about Blyton’s work: ‘There is rather a lot of the Pinky-winky-Doodle-doodle Dum-dumm type of name (and lots of pixies) in the original tales’.

printed on top of one another

April 25, 2018

 

on top ofPhilippa recently contributed to the annual World Book Night event organised by Sarah Bodman of UWE. This year’s theme was based on the text ‘Watching God’ one of the short stories within Three Moments of an Explosion by China Miéville. The brief was to read the story and send a visual response to the text. The work was exhibited from 1st – 30th April 2018 in the study area at Bower Ashton Library, Bristol. The work has only been collated and published as a paperback ‘ur-text’ which is in keeping with the book’s theme. The title is Their Eyes Were Watching God – the book searched for but never found.

A copy of the artist’s book has been accepted by Tate Britain for their artist’s book collection.

A copy of the book can be ordered here.