Archive for the ‘typography’ Category

london’s best design event(s)

June 23, 2019

It’s official. Not only free (and cheap) but one of London’s best design events.

The Typographic Dante is on at the South Bank Centre until the end of the month.

More events can be found here: https://www.designcalendar.io/london/events.

And don’t forget, when you get there…

Thanks to Catherine Dixon for the photo.

inferno and purgatory

June 14, 2019

Regular readers of our blog will know that Barrie has been working on an ongoing project for the last 30 years – and counting.

The Typographic Dante (currently on show at the National Poetry Library in London’s South Bank Centre) is a series of typographic illustrations – one for each of the 100 cantos of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

The 34 illustrations for The Inferno are made with Letterpress…

And the 33 illustrations for Purgatory are all made with Typewriters (and a number of coloured ribbons).

Paradise is still in progress (19 more cantos to go) and each one of those is created with Letraset.

danteggiare

June 14, 2019

Barrie’s latest Artists’ Book Danteggiare is a collection of translations into English of the first terza rima of Dante’s Inferno. It was inspired by a comment made by Chris McCabe at the National Poetry Library during the installation of The Typographic Dante exhibition.

The title is from an article written for Bookanista by Mika Provata-Carlone.

The book contains 94 translations from 1782–2018. The fact it took over 450 years to be translated into English is considered, in some part, to be due to Dante’s Catholic views being at odds with Protestant English audiences, who would have seen his vision of the afterlife as heretical.

The book is not complete – first three lines of about 20 translations currently elude Barrie. Eventually, they’ll be included in a second edition of the book – if you happen to have copies of the following editions to hand, please e-mail him and let him know what the first three lines are…

1862 William Patrick Wilkie

1895 Robert Urquhart

1898 Eugene Jacob Lee-Hamilton

1901 John Carpenter Garnier

1903 Edward Wilberforce

1911 Charles Edwin Wheeler

1914 Edith Mary Shaw

1915 Edward Joshua Edwardes

1922 Henry John Hooper

1931 Lacy Lockert

1948 Patrick Cummins

1949 Harry Morgan Ayres

1954 Howard Russell Huse

1956 Glen Levin Swiggett

1958 Mary Prentice Lillie

1962 Clara Stillman Reed

1965 William F. Ennis

1965 Aldo Maugeri

the magazine: march

June 14, 2019

The Caseroom Press has just published the third part of Alan Mason’s The Magazine – A Novel in Thirteen Parts.

The Magazine follows the form, and manner of a Victorian serial. This artist’s book/novel plays out in thirteen distinct, and distinctive instalments replete with cliff-hangers, poems, letters of complaint, improving articles, amendments, announcements, plagiarisms of no great account and tall tales that fall short.

The project is supported by the Edinburgh College of Art and copies are available from the author.

alan[dot]mason[at]ed[dot]ac[dot]uk

 

bookanista

May 10, 2019

A very big thank you to Mika Provata-Carlone – a Dante scholar, translator, editor and illustrator – for her very thoughtful and insightful review of The Typographic Dante exhibition over at Bookanista: http://bookanista.com/vision-eternity/.

Having worked on the project independently for so long, it was quite wonderful to discuss it in depth with someone who has such a deep understanding of Dante and the Divine Comedy. As you may know, Barrie discovered Dante’s Inferno through pop culture as a teenager and has never formally studied the life of Dante or the Divine Comedy, even though Dante has been with him as an ongoing project for 30 years now.

At the opening of the show, Barrie also met some medievalists from the British Library and the talk (and performance) inspired Philobiblon, [(on) the love of books], to write a blog post about the first printed editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy.

Interestingly enough, the blog post mentions that as a medievalist, he rarely thinks of the printed history of Dante’s (Divine) Comedy – as a typographer Barrie rarely thought of the manuscripts of the Divine Comedy, until very recently. The British Library online archive (http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/) is a stunning resource and has inspired Barrie to look a little further back into history than his role as a graphic designer and lecturer usually takes him.

He would recommend the following books if you find it all as interesting as he does: Books Before Print by Erik Kwakkel and The Book by Keith Houston.

The Typographic Dante Show is on at the National Poetry Library, South Bank Center until the 30th June.

 

 

 

the typographic bloody dante

May 4, 2019

The Typographic Dante opened at the National Poetry Library on Tuesday night. A sold-out gig, Barrie took the opportunity to wax lyrical about Dante in popular culture, explain what else he’d been up to in the 30 years he’d been working on the project, and performed old favourites ‘Dead Birds’ and ‘A Song for an Art School’, as well as finding room to include some new material.

A big thank you to Chris McCabe for making the exhibition happen, and Dan, Dani and Mark for their technical support in hanging the show.

It’s an incredible venue and an absolute delight to be able to exhibit the work there.

https://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whats-on/134923-typographic-dante-2019

 

cheerio and toodle pip to fond farewells

February 22, 2019

 

bookerspostersmPhilippa is happy to announce that Fond Farewells a book she collaborated on with Angie Bulter in 2016 has been accepted as part of the Idaho Booker’s Dozen; curated by Stephanie Bacon, Professor of Art and Director of Idaho Center for the Book, the exhibition will tour thirteen different venues in Idaho in thirteen months from March 2019 to March 2020.

04 ff

pinky winky doodle doodle dum dumm

July 11, 2018

When a colleague recently offered Philippa six Enid Blyton editions from the 50s she jumped at the chance to take them, seeing it as an opportunity to develop further work around the altered book genre.

The initial intention was to highlight childhood memories of reading Enid Blyton, however it soon became clear that opinions of the books had changed in recent years with Blyton receiving a lot of negative press; eventually it was the reviews of the novels that became the basis of the project.

Using online sources, each unfavorable comment relating to Enid’s novels was recorded and a system devised where the more recurrent the word, the larger it would appear. The 1958 edition of Five get in a Fix was carefully taken apart and divided into 12 sequential sections, using the system of scale each of the found words were over-printed onto the original pages causing the content to be gradually obliterated.

The title of the book is taken from an internal memo written in 1938 by Jean Sutcliffe – Head of the BBC Schools Department, which was not particularly complimentary about Blyton’s work: ‘There is rather a lot of the Pinky-winky-Doodle-doodle Dum-dumm type of name (and lots of pixies) in the original tales’.

lost property

June 28, 2017

Philippa would like to thank the gentleman at BABE 2017 who gave her the idea for this book… Lost & Found follows on from a previous edition called On the Line, but this time uses left over train tickets and a 1974 Southern Region timetable to form a maze book that documents all the weird and wonderful items left on the London Transport system. This is probably the smallest book in the Caseroom catalogue, measuring just 45 x 55mm

greetings to nyc

May 26, 2017

This week we heard from Angie Butler who shared the good news that the letterpress animation made from LENvention 1 in 2013, of which Philippa was part of, will be shown at the New York Centre for Book Arts from July-September 2017 as part of the exhibition ‘Animation and the Book Arts’ – having visited the Centre several times, we never imagined that we would ever have work on show in NYC!