Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

local heroes

June 27, 2017

The Caseroom Press are very pleased to be making not one, but two more appearances on the Eye Magazine blog this week.

As part of their regular Books Received section, Barrie’s Word Disco gets a mention, as does Steven Heller & Gail Anderson’s latest tome, Type Tells Tales – which both Philippa and Barrie appear in – Eye describe it as a ‘stimulating compendium of type experiments and explorations, both contemporary and historical. These range from familiar classics (Marinetti, Cage, Massin, Drucker, Corita Kent) to local heroes such as Alida Sayer, Angie Butler & Philippa Wood and Sam Winston.’

word disco

February 10, 2017

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Our third book of found texts – Word Disco – is a sequel to Ken Cockburn’s Overheard/Overlooked (2011) and Overlooked/Overheard (2015).

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As with the last book, Second Year Graphic Design students at the School of Art & Design were asked to keep their ears open last summer. When they returned to University, the texts were collated and selected by Ken Cockburn then typeset by Barrie Tullett.

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Visually it’s quite a departure from the previous books in the series, and from Barrie’s typographic work in general – the texts being typeset, distorted on photocopiers then edited, coloured and composed in Photoshop.

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The book has contributions from Lee Flatman, Ryan Forrest, Megan Favell, Ashley Godber, Holly Humphries, Joshua Jepson and Ashley Gillott.

dante in dublin – ready and waiting

February 9, 2017

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Carla and her team at the National Print Museum have done a wonderful job with the hanging of the show.

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The Typographic Dante has never looked so good.

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The show opens to the public on Friday the 10th of February and is open until Sunday the 2nd of April.

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A huge thank you to the Museum for all their hard work in organising the exhibition – and to Brenda Dermody for designing the beautiful publicity materials for the show.

dante in dublin

February 1, 2017

The Black Smoke

The Typographic Dante is about to go on show at the National Print Museum in Dublin. Barrie has been working on the project ever since he was a student at the Chelsea School of Art.

Eventually each of the 100 cantos of Dante’s Divine Comedy will be illustrated using a different ‘obsolete’ technology for each of the three books. The 34 cantos of The Inferno are realised through letterpress printing, the 33 cantos of Purgatory are created on the typewriter, and the 33 cantos of Paradise will be illustrated with Letraset.

Window mounting the work

The illustrations for Inferno are now complete – all 34 cantos, and this is the first time they’ll have been exhibited together, along with 20 pieces from the on-going work for Purgatory.

abandon every hope

The National Print Museum is an absolute gem of a place; it collects, documents, preserves, exhibits, interprets and makes accessible the material evidence of the printing craft, and fosters associated skills of the craft in Ireland. It’s an absolute honour and delight to be a part of it.

on the road again

October 23, 2016

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Barrie had the pleasure of travelling up to Newcastle on Friday to talk to Graphic Design and Illustration students at the Northumbria University.

He’d been invited up by the extremely talented Sara Ogilvie, and spoke about The Caseroom Press, Typewriter Art and also took a few carrier bags full of Artists’ books for the students to look at (Philippa’s fabric printed Delia Taught Me To Cook was a particular favourite).

There was even a question about his Typographic Dante (he’d not mentioned it in the talk, but one of the students had really done their research). If anyone’s particularly interested in that, there’s an article about it here: Academia.

It was lovely to see Sara again – she’s also one of the illustrators for Utopian Tales – and he was given a grand tour of their studios, wonderful print room and small, but beautifully formed, letterpress studio.

A really delightful day.

So why the rather forlorn picture of his bags on the platform at Newark?

He forgot to take any photos when he was there.

the image in the machine

October 19, 2016

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Barrie had the pleasure of going to the Liverpool School of Art & Design at the end of September. He had a paper accepted for the Seventh International Conference on The Image.

 

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His parallel session (Learning Images) included wonderful talks on Virtual Illumination by Alexander Nevill, from the Centre for Moving Image Research, University of West England – Quite brilliant and well worth booking him for a talk if you’ve got some budget to spare – and Jim Hamlyn’s; The Truth About Images, which was another, very thought provoking high point which asked to what extent are photographs ‘truth dependent’.

Barrie spoke about portraiture and the typewriter. Apparently this is quite a niche subject, judging by the fact one of the audience asked, ‘Is that even a thing?’

He’s even managed to meet the deadline for submitting the paper to the Journal of the Image. So, it might even end up in print.

the stone texts

March 6, 2016

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Followers of the blog might remember that in the Summer, Barrie worked for Mary Bourne and Ken Cockburn on a rather nice project called the Merkinch Circles. Barrie set some texts based on the results of a series of writing workshops and site visits to the new flood defences in Inverness.

As you can see, the circle poems written for the workshops have now been carved into stone and are located on the site.

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Mary Bourne is a visual artist whose work explores mankind’s emotional, intellectual and physical relationships with the world we live in. Based in rural Moray in the North East of Scotland she works principally in natural stone, using a variety of techniques (carving, sandblasting, heat and polishing) to find subtle physical forms for poetic ideas. More information about her work can be found on her website: http://www.marybourne.co.uk/

electric glass

October 21, 2015

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A new gallery space for contemporary art has opened in Brussels; the Société. A former factory (the Société Bruxelloise d’electricité), built in the early 1930s, the first exhibition intends to create a dialogue between contemporary digital art and 1960 concept art, ‘through the common denominator of semantics’.

The invited artists are Cory Arcangel, Aram Bartholl, Vuc Cosic, Alec de Busschere, Alessandro de Francesco, Sebastien Delvaux, Gabriele de Vietri, Frederic Fourdinier, Jason Huff, LAb[au], jan Robert Leegte, Jurg Lehni, Caroline le Mehaute, Michel Mazzoni, Steven Pippin, Studio Nand, Marius Watz and our very own Barrie Tullett, who made a special edition of the Poem to Philip Glass for the exhibition.

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The exhibition is on until the 19th December.

Thanks to Cecilie Bjørgås Jordhiem for photographs of the Poem to Philip Glass.

typographic dreams

March 31, 2015

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Barrie spent the weekend with like-minded typographers, assessing the International Society of Typographic Designers Student Awards.

All the hopes and dreams of aspiring young typographers were waiting in a series of boxes, folios and folders full of typographic treats, delights, books, pamphlets, posters and paraphernalia.

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The teams were watched over by various models of monopoly playing pieces, including a train, a boot, a extremely large bowler hat, and a very friendly dog. We have no idea why they were there, but they made a welcome addition to the weekend…

ISTD Weekend

The assessors about to begin their tasks (photo from the ISTD Twitter Feed).

start doing. stop undoing.

March 16, 2015

posters

Barrie’s most recent books have all been digitally produced, with the attendant luxury of the endless undo. So in the spirit of the Start/Stop Manifesto, he went into The Caseroom today and started doing and stopped undoing – working with Letterpress – and all without the luxury of force-quitting or reverting to saved…

Art School Manifesto

 

His first piece was the Manifesto for an Art School. Already out of date with its omission of ‘Google’ and its insistence on ‘drawing’. But everything you need to know about how to be an Art Student. More or less.

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Talking Qwerty.

I’m Waiting for a Sign

 

StopGo

 

A second edition of the Semantic Noise that is the StopGo poster.

Your Defense is my Defence

Your Defense is my Defence. 

The trick is, of course, to keep doing.